Living Wall
London’s newest green wall is also its largest. The 3,770-square-foot bio-tapestry cloaks the southern end of the Rubens Hotel at the Palace, just a stone’s throw away from the symbolic seat of British rule. The Living Wall, with its dense variety of flora—some 10,000 plants—is a vibrant piece of public art, one with a sustainable ethos meant to be digestible by all.
by Gary Grant
ZoomInfo
Living Wall
London’s newest green wall is also its largest. The 3,770-square-foot bio-tapestry cloaks the southern end of the Rubens Hotel at the Palace, just a stone’s throw away from the symbolic seat of British rule. The Living Wall, with its dense variety of flora—some 10,000 plants—is a vibrant piece of public art, one with a sustainable ethos meant to be digestible by all.
by Gary Grant
ZoomInfo
Living Wall
London’s newest green wall is also its largest. The 3,770-square-foot bio-tapestry cloaks the southern end of the Rubens Hotel at the Palace, just a stone’s throw away from the symbolic seat of British rule. The Living Wall, with its dense variety of flora—some 10,000 plants—is a vibrant piece of public art, one with a sustainable ethos meant to be digestible by all.
by Gary Grant
ZoomInfo
Living Wall
London’s newest green wall is also its largest. The 3,770-square-foot bio-tapestry cloaks the southern end of the Rubens Hotel at the Palace, just a stone’s throw away from the symbolic seat of British rule. The Living Wall, with its dense variety of flora—some 10,000 plants—is a vibrant piece of public art, one with a sustainable ethos meant to be digestible by all.
by Gary Grant
ZoomInfo
Living Wall
London’s newest green wall is also its largest. The 3,770-square-foot bio-tapestry cloaks the southern end of the Rubens Hotel at the Palace, just a stone’s throw away from the symbolic seat of British rule. The Living Wall, with its dense variety of flora—some 10,000 plants—is a vibrant piece of public art, one with a sustainable ethos meant to be digestible by all.
by Gary Grant
ZoomInfo

Living Wall

London’s newest green wall is also its largest. The 3,770-square-foot bio-tapestry cloaks the southern end of the Rubens Hotel at the Palace, just a stone’s throw away from the symbolic seat of British rule. The Living Wall, with its dense variety of flora—some 10,000 plants—is a vibrant piece of public art, one with a sustainable ethos meant to be digestible by all.

by Gary Grant

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